First Order Priorities

Broaden and Strengthen Base of Support for Ocean-Based CDR

Version published: 

It is essential to swiftly raise awareness of and knowledge about ocean-based CDR across the key sectors and actors that are engaged in shaping climate and ocean policy. As various alternatives are evaluated, ocean-based CDR needs a “seat at the table” and to receive due consideration. This requires a much broader array of voices articulating the case for consideration than we currently have. It is a priority to engage a broad and diverse range of credible individuals, organizations and entities to vocally support research and development of ocean-based CDR.  

The key first step is to design and launch a multi-dimensional, multi-year communications campaign to reach critical actors in this space. 

  • Target actors include policymakers at multiple levels, climate and ocean specialists, marine sectors, scientists, investors, philanthropists, entrepreneurs and others.  The campaign should be designed to educate about the outsize and growing impacts of greenhouse gas pollution on the oceans, the role of CDR as one approach to slowing these impacts, and the potential role of ocean-based pathways for CDR.  All with the underlying objective to expand support for accelerated research, development and demonstration of ocean-based CDR pathways. 

The communications campaign should: 

      • Identify all target audiences that will be part of creating an enabling environment for ocean-based CDR RD&D
      • Conduct research on their current perceptions and understanding of ocean-based CDR. 
      • Develop appropriate content and information formats for these key audiences.
      • Identify and engage credible spokespeople (scientists, business leaders, other opinion leaders) to help carry the messages[1]As an example of the power of well-positioned spokespeople, look to the recently announced Carbon Removal XPrize funded by Elon Musk https://www.xprize.org/prizes/elonmusk .

It is essential to swiftly raise awareness of and knowledge about ocean-based CDR across the key sectors and actors that are engaged in shaping climate and ocean policy. As various alternatives are evaluated, ocean-based CDR needs a “seat at the table” and to receive due consideration. This requires a much broader array of voices articulating the case for consideration than we currently have. It is a priority to engage a broad and diverse range of credible individuals, organizations and entities to vocally support research and development of ocean-based CDR.  

The key first step is to design and launch a multi-dimensional, multi-year communications campaign to reach critical actors in this space. 

  • Target actors include policymakers at multiple levels, climate and ocean specialists, marine sectors, scientists, investors, philanthropists, entrepreneurs and others.  The campaign should be designed to educate about the outsize and growing impacts of greenhouse gas pollution on the oceans, the role of CDR as one approach to slowing these impacts, and the potential role of ocean-based pathways for CDR.  All with the underlying objective to expand support for accelerated research, development and demonstration of ocean-based CDR pathways. 

The communications campaign should: 

      • Identify all target audiences that will be part of creating an enabling environment for ocean-based CDR RD&D
      • Conduct research on their current perceptions and understanding of ocean-based CDR. 
      • Develop appropriate content and information formats for these key audiences.
      • Identify and engage credible spokespeople (scientists, business leaders, other opinion leaders) to help carry the messages[1]As an example of the power of well-positioned spokespeople, look to the recently announced Carbon Removal XPrize funded by Elon Musk https://www.xprize.org/prizes/elonmusk .

It is essential to swiftly raise awareness of and knowledge about ocean-based CDR across the key sectors and actors that are engaged in shaping climate and ocean policy. As various alternatives are evaluated, ocean-based CDR needs a “seat at the table” and to receive due consideration. This requires a much broader array of voices articulating the case for consideration than we currently have. It is a priority to engage a broad and diverse range of credible individuals, organizations and entities to vocally support research and development of ocean-based CDR.  

The key first step is to design and launch a multi-dimensional, multi-year communications campaign to reach critical actors in this space. 

  • Target actors include policymakers at multiple levels, climate and ocean specialists, marine sectors, scientists, investors, philanthropists, entrepreneurs and others.  The campaign should be designed to educate about the outsize and growing impacts of greenhouse gas pollution on the oceans, the role of CDR as one approach to slowing these impacts, and the potential role of ocean-based pathways for CDR.  All with the underlying objective to expand support for accelerated research, development and demonstration of ocean-based CDR pathways. 

The communications campaign should: 

      • Identify all target audiences that will be part of creating an enabling environment for ocean-based CDR RD&D
      • Conduct research on their current perceptions and understanding of ocean-based CDR. 
      • Develop appropriate content and information formats for these key audiences.
      • Identify and engage credible spokespeople (scientists, business leaders, other opinion leaders) to help carry the messages.

Projects

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Ensure Broad Public Engagement in All Field Trials

Version published: 

Ocean-based CDR field trials will stand the best chance of success when they are developed with as many communities of interest participating as possible. All practitioners and researchers need to move field trials forward with transparency and broad stakeholder and interest group involvement, and with third-party scientific review and validation. It is particularly important to expand access for diverse communities of interest to participate in the development of this field.  

Researchers and practitioners need to: 

  • Cultivate alliances with diverse stakeholders:
    • Communities subjected to ocean change, including fishers and tribal communities.
    • Indigenous and tribal communities who often hold legal rights to the sea and marine resources.
    • Work with partners already trusted by communities (e.g., SeaGrant in the US).
    • Work with local stakeholders to ensure that benefits of field testing (environmental and economic) are equitably shared, and that risks of field testing are not externalized on local communities.
  • Ensure there are adequate resources as part of field trial designs to engage stakeholders.
  • Identify and quantity co-benefits to the environment and people of ocean-based CDR approaches.
  • Engage social scientists to design involvement processes and help address economic, social, and political challenges and opportunities around ocean-based CDR.
  • Ensure broad dissemination of progress and results. 

Ocean-based CDR field trials will stand the best chance of success when they are developed with as many communities of interest participating as possible. All practitioners and researchers need to move field trials forward with transparency and broad stakeholder and interest group involvement, and with third-party scientific review and validation. It is particularly important to expand access for diverse communities of interest to participate in the development of this field.  

Researchers and practitioners need to: 

  • Cultivate alliances with diverse stakeholders:
    • Communities subjected to ocean change, including fishers and tribal communities.
    • Indigenous and tribal communities who often hold legal rights to the sea and marine resources.
    • Work with partners already trusted by communities (e.g., SeaGrant in the US).
    • Work with local stakeholders to ensure that benefits of field testing (environmental and economic) are equitably shared, and that risks of field testing are not externalized on local communities.
  • Ensure there are adequate resources as part of field trial designs to engage stakeholders.
  • Identify and quantity co-benefits to the environment and people of ocean-based CDR approaches.
  • Engage social scientists to design involvement processes and help address economic, social, and political challenges and opportunities around ocean-based CDR.
  • Ensure broad dissemination of progress and results. 

Projects

No projects listed. Want to add a project to this section? Become a Contributor.

Develop a code of conduct to guide scientific experimentation and field trials.

Version published: 
  • Engage relevant stakeholders in development of a code[1]Hubert, A.‐M. (2021), A Code of Conduct for Responsible Geoengineering Research. Glob Policy. https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12845 to guide scientific experimentation and field trials in a manner that is transparent, participatory, rigorously monitored and carefully controlled.
    • The Aspen Institute, with support from the ClimateWorks Foundation, is convening a working group to assemble a code of conduct for responsible research and development of ocean-based CDR technologies.
  • Develop assessment frameworks to guide scientific field trials under all relevant international conventions and national laws.
  • Engage relevant stakeholders in development of a code[1]Hubert, A.‐M. (2021), A Code of Conduct for Responsible Geoengineering Research. Glob Policy. https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12845 to guide scientific experimentation and field trials in a manner that is transparent, participatory, rigorously monitored and carefully controlled.
    • The Aspen Institute, with support from the ClimateWorks Foundation, is convening a working group to assemble a code of conduct for responsible research and development of ocean-based CDR technologies.
  • Develop assessment frameworks to guide scientific field trials under all relevant international conventions and national laws.
  • Engage relevant stakeholders in development of a code[1]Hubert, A.‐M. (2021), A Code of Conduct for Responsible Geoengineering Research. Glob Policy. https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12845 to guide scientific experimentation and field trials in a manner that is transparent, participatory, rigorously monitored and carefully controlled.
  • Develop assessment frameworks to guide scientific field trials under all relevant international conventions and national laws.
  • Engage relevant stakeholders in development of a code to guide scientific experimentation and field trials in a manner that is transparent, participatory, rigorously monitored and carefully controlled.
  • Develop assessment frameworks to guide scientific field trials under all relevant international conventions and national laws.

Projects

No projects listed. Want to add a project to this section? Become a Contributor.

Engage Governments

Version published: 
  • Government actors at various levels responsible for climate action need to be specifically engaged to ensure that ocean-based CDR is considered in national programs for climate mitigation. There requires increasing governmental awareness and support for ocean-based CDR RD&D at national and international scales.

    • Increase outreach to relevant political jurisdictions to educate about ocean-based CDR opportunities and needs.
    • Seek to expand governmental involvement in ocean-based CDR through enabling legislation and policy.
    • Work with relevant jurisdictions to expand governmental support/funding for needed RD&D.
    • Build a broad coalition/alliance to demonstrate the diversity of interests in support of ocean-based CDR testing.
  • Government actors at various levels responsible for climate action need to be specifically engaged to ensure that ocean-based CDR is considered in national programs for climate mitigation. There requires increasing governmental awareness and support for ocean-based CDR RD&D at national and international scales.

    • Increase outreach to relevant political jurisdictions to educate about ocean-based CDR opportunities and needs.
    • Seek to expand governmental involvement in ocean-based CDR through enabling legislation and policy.
    • Work with relevant jurisdictions to expand governmental support/funding for needed RD&D.
    • Build a broad coalition/alliance to demonstrate the diversity of interests in support of ocean-based CDR testing.

Projects

No projects listed. Want to add a project to this section? Become a Contributor.

Develop Effective Regulatory & Governance Structures

  • Sub-national, national, and international regimes to govern development and testing of ocean-based CDR are absolutely critical for this field to progress. Key first order needs are:

    • Governance Reviews: Governance reviews are needed to identify and describe the existing legal frameworks for ocean-based CDR pathways in priority coastal countries/jurisdictions.
      • The Sabin Law Center at Columbia University has initiated such an effort with working papers to look at legal challenges and opportunities for:
        • Macroalgal cultivation and sequestration and ocean alkalinity enhancement in the US[1]Webb, R.; Silverman-Roati, K. and Gerrard, M. (2021). Removing Carbon Dioxide Through Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement and Seaweed Cultivation: Legal Challenges and Opportunities. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=3800494 . 
        • Offshore carbon capture and storage in Canada[2]Webb, R. and Gerrard, M. (2021). The Legal Framework for Offshore Carbon Capture and Storage in Canada. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=3800493
        • The legal framework for sub-seabed carbon storage in the U.S and Canada [3]Webb, R and Gerrard, M. (2017). Policy Readiness for Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Northeast. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=2986463 [4]Webb, R and Gerrard, M. (2019) Overcoming Impediments to Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage: Legal Issues in the U.S. and Canada. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=3359754

    Planned additional working papers will add geographic context and expand the suite of ocean-based CDR pathways considered.

    • Identify Needed Improvements to Governance Regimes 
      • Review scans to assess gaps, needs, and opportunities.
      • Convene stakeholders at relevant scales to discuss and develop draft proposals for new or amended regimes, including developing specific legislative and executive directives that provide key agencies with scope to engage in ocean-based CDR.[5]Energy Futures Initiative (2020). Uncharted Waters: Expanding the Options for Carbon Dioxide Removal in Coastal and Ocean Environments. https://static1.squarespace.com/static/58ec123cb3db2bd94e057628/t/6011a63f65321405af54681f/1611769420810/Uncharted+Waters.pdf.pdf
      • Engage with sub-national jurisdictions. Small-scale field testing under the jurisdiction of cities and/or states may help build data and evidence to support larger-scale testing in federal waters and under federal authority.
    • Review and Propose Needed Changes to International Regimes
      • Engage a global community of experts to review existing international governance regimes and laws for ocean-based CDR RD&D, and to make specific recommendations for improving the international regimes.  
        • Identify the specific processes and opportunities to more clearly embed governance and oversight of ocean-based CDR into international governance frameworks.
      • Develop Tools to Help Researchers and Experimental Efforts
      • Permitting guides:  Develop specific tools and plans by country (and sub-national jurisdictions) to navigate the leasing, permitting, and legal considerations.
      • Convene relevant practitioners in working groups to identify and advocate for common tools and information needs that would benefit all practitioners of a given methodology (e.g. coastal enhanced weathering) in a specific jurisdiction. 
      • Co-develop such tools with the relevant permitting agencies to “bring regulators along for the journey”.
      • Identify and support development of the needed interagency and intergovernmental structures to facilitate review and compliance.
  • Sub-national, national, and international regimes to govern development and testing of ocean-based CDR are absolutely critical for this field to progress. Key first order needs are:

    • Governance Reviews: Governance reviews are needed to identify and describe the existing legal frameworks for ocean-based CDR pathways in priority coastal countries/jurisdictions.
      • The Sabin Law Center at Columbia University has initiated such an effort with working papers to look at legal challenges and opportunities for:
        • Macroalgal cultivation and sequestration and ocean alkalinity enhancement in the US[1]Webb, R.; Silverman-Roati, K. and Gerrard, M. (2021). Removing Carbon Dioxide Through Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement and Seaweed Cultivation: Legal Challenges and Opportunities. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=3800494 . 
        • Offshore carbon capture and storage in Canada[2]Webb, R. and Gerrard, M. (2021). The Legal Framework for Offshore Carbon Capture and Storage in Canada. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=3800493
        • The legal framework for sub-seabed carbon storage in the U.S and Canada [3]Webb, R and Gerrard, M. (2017). Policy Readiness for Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Northeast. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=2986463 [4]Webb, R and Gerrard, M. (2019) Overcoming Impediments to Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage: Legal Issues in the U.S. and Canada. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=3359754

    Planned additional working papers will add geographic context and expand the suite of ocean-based CDR pathways considered.

    • Identify Needed Improvements to Governance Regimes 
      • Review scans to assess gaps, needs, and opportunities.
      • Convene stakeholders at relevant scales to discuss and develop draft proposals for new or amended regimes, including developing specific legislative and executive directives that provide key agencies with scope to engage in ocean-based CDR.[5]Energy Futures Initiative (2020). Uncharted Waters: Expanding the Options for Carbon Dioxide Removal in Coastal and Ocean Environments. https://static1.squarespace.com/static/58ec123cb3db2bd94e057628/t/6011a63f65321405af54681f/1611769420810/Uncharted+Waters.pdf.pdf
      • Engage with sub-national jurisdictions. Small-scale field testing under the jurisdiction of cities and/or states may help build data and evidence to support larger-scale testing in federal waters and under federal authority.
    • Review and Propose Needed Changes to International Regimes
      • Engage a global community of experts to review existing international governance regimes and laws for ocean-based CDR RD&D, and to make specific recommendations for improving the international regimes.  
        • Identify the specific processes and opportunities to more clearly embed governance and oversight of ocean-based CDR into international governance frameworks.
      • Develop Tools to Help Researchers and Experimental Efforts
      • Permitting guides:  Develop specific tools and plans by country (and sub-national jurisdictions) to navigate the leasing, permitting, and legal considerations.
      • Convene relevant practitioners in working groups to identify and advocate for common tools and information needs that would benefit all practitioners of a given methodology (e.g. coastal enhanced weathering) in a specific jurisdiction. 
      • Co-develop such tools with the relevant permitting agencies to “bring regulators along for the journey”.
      • Identify and support development of the needed interagency and intergovernmental structures to facilitate review and compliance.
  • Sub-national, national, and international regimes to govern development and testing of ocean-based CDR are absolutely critical for this field to progress. Key first order needs are:

    • Governance Reviews: Governance reviews are needed to identify and describe the existing legal frameworks for ocean-based CDR pathways in priority coastal countries/jurisdictions.
      • The Sabin Law Center at Columbia University has initiated such an effort with working papers to look at legal challenges and opportunities for:
        • Macroalgal cultivation and sequestration and ocean alkalinity enhancement in the US[1]Webb, R.; Silverman-Roati, K. and Gerrard, M. (2021). Removing Carbon Dioxide Through Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement and Seaweed Cultivation: Legal Challenges and Opportunities. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=3800494 . 
        • Offshore carbon capture and storage in Canada[2]Webb, R. and Gerrard, M. (2021). The Legal Framework for Offshore Carbon Capture and Storage in Canada. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=3800493
        • The legal framework for sub-seabed carbon storage in the U.S[3]Webb, R and Gerrard, M. (2017). Policy Readiness for Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Northeast. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=2986463

    Planned additional working papers will add geographic context and expand the suite of ocean-based CDR pathways considered.

    • Identify Needed Improvements to Governance Regimes 
      • Review scans to assess gaps, needs, and opportunities.
      • Convene stakeholders at relevant scales to discuss and develop draft proposals for new or amended regimes, including developing specific legislative and executive directives that provide key agencies with scope to engage in ocean-based CDR.[4]Energy Futures Initiative (2020). Uncharted Waters: Expanding the Options for Carbon Dioxide Removal in Coastal and Ocean Environments. https://static1.squarespace.com/static/58ec123cb3db2bd94e057628/t/6011a63f65321405af54681f/1611769420810/Uncharted+Waters.pdf.pdf
      • Engage with sub-national jurisdictions. Small-scale field testing under the jurisdiction of cities and/or states may help build data and evidence to support larger-scale testing in federal waters and under federal authority.
    • Review and Propose Needed Changes to International Regimes
      • Engage a global community of experts to review existing international governance regimes and laws for ocean-based CDR RD&D, and to make specific recommendations for improving the international regimes.  
        • Identify the specific processes and opportunities to more clearly embed governance and oversight of ocean-based CDR into international governance frameworks.
      • Develop Tools to Help Researchers and Experimental Efforts
      • Permitting guides:  Develop specific tools and plans by country (and sub-national jurisdictions) to navigate the leasing, permitting, and legal considerations.
      • Convene relevant practitioners in working groups to identify and advocate for common tools and information needs that would benefit all practitioners of a given methodology (e.g. coastal enhanced weathering) in a specific jurisdiction. 
      • Co-develop such tools with the relevant permitting agencies to “bring regulators along for the journey”.
      • Identify and support development of the needed interagency and intergovernmental structures to facilitate review and compliance.
  • Sub-national, national, and international regimes to govern development and testing of ocean-based CDR are absolutely critical for this field to progress. Key first order needs are:

    • Governance Reviews: Governance reviews are needed to identify and describe the existing legal frameworks for ocean-based CDR pathways in priority coastal countries/jurisdictions.
      • The Sabin Law Center at Columbia University has initiated such an effort with working papers to look at legal challenges and opportunities for:
        • Macroalgal cultivation and sequestration and ocean alkalinity enhancement in the US[1]Webb, R. and Silverman-Roati, K. and Gerrard, M. (2021). Removing Carbon Dioxide Through Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement and Seaweed Cultivation: Legal Challenges and Opportunities. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School, Columbia Public Law Research Paper Forthcoming https://ssrn.com/abstract=3800494 . 
        • Offshore carbon capture and storage in Canada[2]Webb, R.M., Gerrard, M.B., n.d. THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK FOR OFFSHORE CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE IN CANADA 35.
        • The legal framework for sub-seabed carbon storage in the U.S[3]Webb, R and Gerrard, M. (2017). Policy Readiness for Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Northeast. Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School. https://ssrn.com/abstract=2986463

    Planned additional working papers will add geographic context and expand the suite of ocean-based CDR pathways considered.

    • Identify Needed Improvements to Governance Regimes 
      • Review scans to assess gaps, needs, and opportunities.
      • Convene stakeholders at relevant scales to discuss and develop draft proposals for new or amended regimes, including developing specific legislative and executive directives that provide key agencies with scope to engage in ocean-based CDR.[4]EFI Report “Uncharted Waters: Expanding the Options for Carbon Dioxide Removal in Coastal and Ocean Environments.” December 2020.
      • Engage with sub-national jurisdictions. Small-scale field testing under the jurisdiction of cities and/or states may help build data and evidence to support larger-scale testing in federal waters and under federal authority.
    • Review and Propose Needed Changes to International Regimes
      • Engage a global community of experts to review existing international governance regimes and laws for ocean-based CDR RD&D, and to make specific recommendations for improving the international regimes.  
        • Identify the specific processes and opportunities to more clearly embed governance and oversight of ocean-based CDR into international governance frameworks.
      • Develop Tools to Help Researchers and Experimental Efforts
      • Permitting guides:  Develop specific tools and plans by country (and sub-national jurisdictions) to navigate the leasing, permitting, and legal considerations.
      • Convene relevant practitioners in working groups to identify and advocate for common tools and information needs that would benefit all practitioners of a given methodology (e.g. coastal enhanced weathering) in a specific jurisdiction. 
      • Co-develop such tools with the relevant permitting agencies to “bring regulators along for the journey”.
      • Identify and support development of the needed interagency and intergovernmental structures to facilitate review and compliance.
  • Sub-national, national, and international regimes to govern development and testing of ocean-based CDR are absolutely critical for this field to progress. Key first order needs are:

    • Governance Reviews: Governance reviews are needed to identify and describe the existing legal frameworks for ocean-based CDR pathways in priority coastal countries/jurisdictions.
      • The Sabin Law Center at Columbia University has initiated such an effort with working papers to look at legal challenges and opportunities for:
        • Macroalgal cultivation and sequestration and ocean alkalinity enhancement in the US[1]Gerrard, M., 2021. Removing Carbon Dioxide Through Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement and Seaweed Cultivation: Legal Challenges and Opportunities. SSRN Journal. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3789914 . 
        • Offshore carbon capture and storage in Canada[2]Webb, R.M., Gerrard, M.B., n.d. THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK FOR OFFSHORE CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE IN CANADA 35.

    Planned additional working papers will add geographic context and expand the suite of ocean-based CDR pathways considered.

    • Identify Needed Improvements to Governance Regimes 
      • Review scans to assess gaps, needs, and opportunities.
      • Convene stakeholders at relevant scales to discuss and develop draft proposals for new or amended regimes, including developing specific legislative and executive directives that provide key agencies with scope to engage in ocean-based CDR.[3]EFI Report “Uncharted Waters: Expanding the Options for Carbon Dioxide Removal in Coastal and Ocean Environments.” December 2020.
      • Engage with sub-national jurisdictions. Small-scale field testing under the jurisdiction of cities and/or states may help build data and evidence to support larger-scale testing in federal waters and under federal authority.
    • Review and Propose Needed Changes to International Regimes
      • Engage a global community of experts to review existing international governance regimes and laws for ocean-based CDR RD&D, and to make specific recommendations for improving the international regimes.  
        • Identify the specific processes and opportunities to more clearly embed governance and oversight of ocean-based CDR into international governance frameworks.
      • Develop Tools to Help Researchers and Experimental Efforts
      • Permitting guides:  Develop specific tools and plans by country (and sub-national jurisdictions) to navigate the leasing, permitting, and legal considerations.
      • Convene relevant practitioners in working groups to identify and advocate for common tools and information needs that would benefit all practitioners of a given methodology (e.g. coastal enhanced weathering) in a specific jurisdiction. 
      • Co-develop such tools with the relevant permitting agencies to “bring regulators along for the journey”.
      • Identify and support development of the needed interagency and intergovernmental structures to facilitate review and compliance.
  • Sub-national, national, and international regimes to govern development and testing of ocean-based CDR are absolutely critical for this field to progress. Key first order needs are:

    • Governance Reviews: Governance reviews are needed to identify and describe the existing legal frameworks for ocean-based CDR pathways in priority coastal countries/jurisdictions.
      • The Sabin Law Center at Columbia University has initiated such an effort with working papers to look at legal challenges and opportunities for:
        • Macroalgal cultivation and sequestration and ocean alkalinity enhancement in the US. 
        • Offshore carbon capture and storage in Canada

    Planned additional working papers will add geographic context and expand the suite of ocean-based CDR pathways considered.

    • Identify Needed Improvements to Governance Regimes 
      • Review scans to assess gaps, needs, and opportunities.
      • Convene stakeholders at relevant scales to discuss and develop draft proposals for new or amended regimes, including developing specific legislative and executive directives that provide key agencies with scope to engage in ocean-based CDR.
      • Engage with sub-national jurisdictions. Small-scale field testing under the jurisdiction of cities and/or states may help build data and evidence to support larger-scale testing in federal waters and under federal authority.
    • Review and Propose Needed Changes to International Regimes
      • Engage a global community of experts to review existing international governance regimes and laws for ocean-based CDR RD&D, and to make specific recommendations for improving the international regimes.  
        • Identify the specific processes and opportunities to more clearly embed governance and oversight of ocean-based CDR into international governance frameworks.
      • Develop Tools to Help Researchers and Experimental Efforts
      • Permitting guides:  Develop specific tools and plans by country (and sub-national jurisdictions) to navigate the leasing, permitting, and legal considerations.
      • Convene relevant practitioners in working groups to identify and advocate for common tools and information needs that would benefit all practitioners of a given methodology (e.g. coastal enhanced weathering) in a specific jurisdiction. 
      • Co-develop such tools with the relevant permitting agencies to “bring regulators along for the journey”.
      • Identify and support development of the needed interagency and intergovernmental structures to facilitate review and compliance.

Projects

No projects listed. Want to add a project to this section? Become a Contributor.

Increase Practitioners in Ocean-based CDR RD&D

Version published: 
  • It is essential to expand the field of researchers from across diverse disciplines to engage on ocean-based CDR-related research.  Many of the above activities to legitimize the field will help draw more scholarly attention but additional actions could also help, such as: 

    • Create prize competitions, awards, and funding opportunities to mobilize ocean scientists and engineers to work on critical needs identified throughout these road maps.  
    • Develop long-term strategies to engage more leading academic and research institutions against these challenges and opportunities to build the next generation of researchers and practitioners.  
  • It is essential to expand the field of researchers from across diverse disciplines to engage on ocean-based CDR-related research.  Many of the above activities to legitimize the field will help draw more scholarly attention but additional actions could also help, such as: 

    • Create prize competitions, awards, and funding opportunities to mobilize ocean scientists and engineers to work on critical needs identified throughout these road maps.  
    • Develop long-term strategies to engage more leading academic and research institutions against these challenges and opportunities to build the next generation of researchers and practitioners.  

Projects

No projects listed. Want to add a project to this section? Become a Contributor.
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